Roll with it

Read­abil­ity

Roll with it

This is the time of year that every­one (espe­cially in north­ern climes like Min­nesota, I think) starts to pack in a lot of sum­mer­time activ­i­ties, know­ing that fall is about to descend. And, it is prep time for stu­dents and teach­ers return­ing to school. I am one of those again; this time I’m teach­ing a class in the Social Work grad­u­ate pro­gram at SCSU; pro­vid­ing instruc­tion in the fun­da­men­tal skills needed to be a social worker.

I am eager to dig into this class and learn the process of teach­ing the the­ory and skills of my pro­fes­sion. Inter­est­ingly, the text­book to be used is the same one I had when I started my MSW pro­gram at Louisiana State Uni­ver­sity in 1987. That was Edi­tion 2, and now I will use Edi­tion 9. Wow! Has it really been that long? I love the syn­chronic­ity of this and can see that it is THE book, and has evolved appro­pri­ately to be cur­rent and cut­ting edge.

I feel that I have evolved in a sim­i­lar way–changing and adapt­ing to stay up-to-date and fresh through the years of hon­ing my craft and help­ing oth­ers who are in the begin­ning stages of their careers.

This is another aspect of resilience, I think; adapt­ing and grow­ing through chal­lenges, upheavals, changes. Becom­ing stronger and remain­ing fit to per­form nec­es­sary tasks and ful­fill new roles.

It can be a very hum­bling process. Many times through the years I have seen a “new” tech­nique or approach intro­duced and embraced, and real­ize I knew some­thing very sim­i­lar to that YEARS ago, and had not really incor­po­rated it. I often have a sense of “I knew that once! Why haven’t I been doing it?” or “Damn, I could have writ­ten that book!” It is dis­con­cert­ing but I have come to real­ize it is an out­come of liv­ing a lot of years and being in a career for 30+ years. I also know that I can’t do it all, nor does it make what I have done less valid.

That’s where “roll with it” comes in. Here’s a definition:

to adjust to dif­fi­cult events as they happen–roll with it.”

Ety­mol­ogy: based on box­ing, from the lit­eral mean­ing roll with the punches (step back or to one side as you are being hit), so that you do not receive the full force of the attack.
Cam­bridge Dic­tio­nary of Amer­i­can Idioms Copy­right © Cam­bridge Uni­ver­sity Press 2003. Repro­duced with permission.

We need to adjust, be flex­i­ble, acco­mo­date and some­times, in order not to get knocked down, we need to take the punch and move with it. The abil­ity to bend and be tough are essen­tial skills in this world. See­ing our imper­fec­tions, errors, short­com­ings, and misses is part of rolling with it. Under­stand­ing our fal­li­bil­ity but not let­ting it under­mine our self-confidence and sense of pur­pose can be dif­fi­cult, but when we do it we can suc­cess­fully move for­ward and attain more wis­dom. Own­ing those truths about our­selves improves our resilience and enhances our abil­ity to accept things, peo­ple, events, that we can­not change, and helps us gain tol­er­ance of oth­ers, as well.

 

This is the time of year that every­one (espe­cially in north­ern climes like Min­nesota, I think) starts to pack in a lot of sum­mer­time activ­i­ties, know­ing that fall is about to descend. And, it is prep time for stu­dents and teach­ers return­ing to school. I am one of those again; this time I’m teach­ing a class in the Social Work grad­u­ate pro­gram at SCSU; pro­vid­ing instruc­tion in the fun­da­men­tal skills needed to be a social worker.

I am eager to dig into this class and learn the process of teach­ing the the­ory and skills of my pro­fes­sion. Inter­est­ingly, the text­book to be used is the same one I had when I started my MSW pro­gram at Louisiana State Uni­ver­sity in 1987. That was Edi­tion 2, and now I will use Edi­tion 9. Wow! Has it really been that long? I love the syn­chronic­ity of this and can see that it is THE book, and has evolved appro­pri­ately to be cur­rent and cut­ting edge.

I feel that I have evolved in a sim­i­lar way–changing and adapt­ing to stay up-to-date and fresh through the years of hon­ing my craft and help­ing oth­ers who are in the begin­ning stages of their careers.

This is another aspect of resilience, I think; adapt­ing and grow­ing through chal­lenges, upheavals, changes. Becom­ing stronger and remain­ing fit to per­form nec­es­sary tasks and ful­fill new roles.

It can be a very hum­bling process. Many times through the years I have seen a “new” tech­nique or approach intro­duced and embraced, and real­ize I knew some­thing very sim­i­lar to that YEARS ago, and had not really incor­po­rated it. I often have a sense of “I knew that once! Why haven’t I been doing it?” or “Damn, I could have writ­ten that book!” It is dis­con­cert­ing but I have come to real­ize it is an out­come of liv­ing a lot of years and being in a career for 30+ years. I also know that I can’t do it all, nor does it make what I have done less valid.

That’s where “roll with it” comes in. Here’s a definition:

to adjust to dif­fi­cult events as they happen–roll with it.”

Ety­mol­ogy: based on box­ing, from the lit­eral mean­ing roll with the punches (step back or to one side as you are being hit), so that you do not receive the full force of the attack.
Cam­bridge Dic­tio­nary of Amer­i­can Idioms Copy­right © Cam­bridge Uni­ver­sity Press 2003. Repro­duced with permission.

We need to adjust, be flex­i­ble, acco­mo­date and some­times, in order not to get knocked down, we need to take the punch and move with it. The abil­ity to bend and be tough are essen­tial skills in this world. See­ing our imper­fec­tions, errors, short­com­ings, and misses is part of rolling with it. Under­stand­ing our fal­li­bil­ity but not let­ting it under­mine our self-confidence and sense of pur­pose can be dif­fi­cult, but when we do it we can suc­cess­fully move for­ward and attain more wis­dom. Own­ing those truths about our­selves improves our resilience and enhances our abil­ity to accept things, peo­ple, events, that we can­not change, and helps us gain tol­er­ance of oth­ers, as well.

 

About SGH

Counselor, searcher
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