More transitions; so what’s new!

Read­abil­ity

More tran­si­tions; so what’s new!

So, I am in the mid­dle of more tran­si­tions. Does it ever stop? No, we just get to cruise some­times. I am not in cruise con­trol right now, but in the midst of some heavy traf­fic, con­struc­tion, detours. I need to be on my toes.

My love rela­tion­ship ended ear­lier this sum­mer, due to core dif­fer­ences in our val­ues and world­views, and an ero­sion of good feel­ings between us.  It has not been easy, but my busy­ness has cer­tainly helped to dis­tract me from the loss.

I have had lots of com­pany, fun week­end activ­i­ties, a heavy work­load and the process of my father mov­ing from assisted liv­ing to nurs­ing home. It has been hec­tic, chal­leng­ing, reward­ing, fun and draining.

Last week­end I spent 4 days with my team, Sand Shells, as crew at the Susan G. Komen 3-Day for the Cure in the Twin Cities. It was, as always, mov­ing, inspir­ing, exhaust­ing and exhil­a­rat­ing. My ankles are still swollen and bruised, and I wasn’t even try­ing to walk the 60 miles! I helped to set up and run Pit Stop 3 with my team. We handed out food, water, Nuun (our sponsor’s sports drink) and encour­age­ment. We used the theme, “Wild, Wild Breasts!” If you haven’t been around the 3-Day, it is quite focused on breasts and hav­ing fun, so plays on words and irrev­er­ent themes rule the day. We had west­ern out­fits and props (even a photo op with a pony!) and got a lot of smiles out of the walk­ers. The spirit and energy of my team­mates was amaz­ing to watch.

The Clos­ing Cer­e­monies, where I was allowed to wear a pink shirt and walk with the sur­vivors, cre­ated feel­ings that are beyond words. The inclu­sion and val­i­da­tion we sur­vivors expe­ri­ence fills my heart up to the brim, and reminds me how pre­cious it is to have come through breast can­cer. There was a moment dur­ing the Walk that I was encour­ag­ing walk­ers with water and thanks, and sud­denly one of them said, “No, thank you, Sur­vivor. Walk­ing three days is noth­ing com­pared to chemo.” She had seen my “Sur­vivor” but­ton. It was so unex­pected and so pow­er­ful that I melted into tears. It made all the sweat, exhaus­tion and body aches worth every minute.

Ear­lier I had vis­i­tors from Swe­den and spent a week with them. It is a spe­cial thing to show them around the area to which the Emi­grants came and have them get to know their Amer­i­can fam­ily bet­ter. I spent a week­end with one of my best friends, her sib­lings and cousins and had a ball. The laugh­ter and cam­er­aderie were delightful.

I have had a full sched­ule at work, because of tak­ing time off here and there, and fill­ing up the remain­ing spaces with clients. Always feel­ing behind and over­whelmed by paper­work, but man­ag­ing to keep my head above water and give clients what they need from me. At times I have heard pos­i­tive feed­back and have been moved to tears by the growth, insight and relief they express, as well as their gratitude.

Finally, I have just started a new endeavor of teach­ing a foun­da­tional social work class at our local uni­ver­sity. My first class met this week and I did well, I think. Thanks to a great cur­ricu­lum I inher­ited from oth­ers, and help from sev­eral pro­fes­sors there, I got through it and feel opti­mistic and enthu­si­as­tic to con­tinue it. It does chal­lenge me, though, and I see that I am a stu­dent this fall too, as well as those in my class!

So, I am in the mid­dle of more tran­si­tions. Does it ever stop? No, we just get to cruise some­times. I am not in cruise con­trol right now, but in the midst of some heavy traf­fic, con­struc­tion, detours. I need to be on my toes.

My love rela­tion­ship ended ear­lier this sum­mer, due to core dif­fer­ences in our val­ues and world­views, and an ero­sion of good feel­ings between us.  It has not been easy, but my busy­ness has cer­tainly helped to dis­tract me from the loss.

I have had lots of com­pany, fun week­end activ­i­ties, a heavy work­load and the process of my father mov­ing from assisted liv­ing to nurs­ing home. It has been hec­tic, chal­leng­ing, reward­ing, fun and draining.

Last week­end I spent 4 days with my team, Sand Shells, as crew at the Susan G. Komen 3-Day for the Cure in the Twin Cities. It was, as always, mov­ing, inspir­ing, exhaust­ing and exhil­a­rat­ing. My ankles are still swollen and bruised, and I wasn’t even try­ing to walk the 60 miles! I helped to set up and run Pit Stop 3 with my team. We handed out food, water, Nuun (our sponsor’s sports drink) and encour­age­ment. We used the theme, “Wild, Wild Breasts!” If you haven’t been around the 3-Day, it is quite focused on breasts and hav­ing fun, so plays on words and irrev­er­ent themes rule the day. We had west­ern out­fits and props (even a photo op with a pony!) and got a lot of smiles out of the walk­ers. The spirit and energy of my team­mates was amaz­ing to watch.

The Clos­ing Cer­e­monies, where I was allowed to wear a pink shirt and walk with the sur­vivors, cre­ated feel­ings that are beyond words. The inclu­sion and val­i­da­tion we sur­vivors expe­ri­ence fills my heart up to the brim, and reminds me how pre­cious it is to have come through breast can­cer. There was a moment dur­ing the Walk that I was encour­ag­ing walk­ers with water and thanks, and sud­denly one of them said, “No, thank you, Sur­vivor. Walk­ing three days is noth­ing com­pared to chemo.” She had seen my “Sur­vivor” but­ton. It was so unex­pected and so pow­er­ful that I melted into tears. It made all the sweat, exhaus­tion and body aches worth every minute.

Ear­lier I had vis­i­tors from Swe­den and spent a week with them. It is a spe­cial thing to show them around the area to which the Emi­grants came and have them get to know their Amer­i­can fam­ily bet­ter. I spent a week­end with one of my best friends, her sib­lings and cousins and had a ball. The laugh­ter and cam­er­aderie were delightful.

I have had a full sched­ule at work, because of tak­ing time off here and there, and fill­ing up the remain­ing spaces with clients. Always feel­ing behind and over­whelmed by paper­work, but man­ag­ing to keep my head above water and give clients what they need from me. At times I have heard pos­i­tive feed­back and have been moved to tears by the growth, insight and relief they express, as well as their gratitude.

Finally, I have just started a new endeavor of teach­ing a foun­da­tional social work class at our local uni­ver­sity. My first class met this week and I did well, I think. Thanks to a great cur­ricu­lum I inher­ited from oth­ers, and help from sev­eral pro­fes­sors there, I got through it and feel opti­mistic and enthu­si­as­tic to con­tinue it. It does chal­lenge me, though, and I see that I am a stu­dent this fall too, as well as those in my class!

About SGH

Counselor, searcher
This entry was posted in Counseling, Health Issues, Relationship, Renewal, Resilience, Transition, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply